More About Dr. Karen Shue

If you are thinking about using neurofeedback to create change in your life,you may want to know a little bit more about me as a service provider.

Top Psychology Clinics in Toronto 2015
Voted 2015’s best Psychologist in Toronto for Psychology treatment and services as reviewed by patients.
Verified by Opencare.com

My Credentials: Just the Facts

  • Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from McGill University
  • Training in neuropsychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hamilton Health Sciences Centre Acquired Brain Injury Program
  • Certificate of Registration as a Psychologist (C.Psych.) (#2318) with areas of practice clinical psychology, rehabilitation psychology, neuropsychology
  • Canadian Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (#04949)
  • Certified Brain Injury Specialist and Trainer, American Academy of Brain Injury for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists
  • Certified Open Focus Neurofeedback Practitioner
  • Technical Certification in NeuroCARE Approach to CNS Functional Transformation using Non-Linear Dynamical Control Procedures
  • Hemoencephalogoraphy training with Dr. Jeff Carmen, creator of the passive infrared hemoencephalography system

My Journey through Psychology

I see our lives as a journey -more of an exploration perhaps,since we don't really know exactly where we're going and exactly what it will look like when we get there.

So I'll describe my journey through the profession of psychology by sharing what I've done and what I learned about myself and providing service at each step.

I pursued a degree in psychology when I had to choose between a career in music and a more "practical" career.

I was drawn to psychology because I was excited about its potential to help people change and because I was fascinated by learning more about the brain and its impact on daily behaviour.

So after I finished my undergraduate degree at Hood College in Maryland, I went off to Brown University to study the brain. In turtles, as it turned out.

Turtles didn't really do it for me, so I transferred from my physiological psychology program to a clinical psychology program at McGill University in Montreal.

Much better.

I studied both clinical psychology and neuropsychology, doing internship placements at the Montreal Neurological Institute and at the Douglas Hospital, working with young people with emotional and brain dysfunction problems.

My dissertation research was about how attention deficit disorder "looks like" frontal lobe dysfunction.

Who knew that years later with more sophisticated brain scanning techniques, it would turn out that this is likely the exact problem?

After Montreal, I worked for two and a half years in a general hospital psychology department, doing psychotherapy with people with physical and/or emotional health concerns.

In 1988, I went to what was then Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals in Hamilton, Ontario to work in the provincial Acquired Brain Injury Program.

My activities there were varied. I worked as a member of an interdisciplinary inpatient brain injury rehabilitation team, did assessments and therapy in the outpatient brain injury clinic, and supervised non-discipline-specific therapists in the Community Outreach program.

I also became the Clinical Director of the "Community Repatriation Program", an Ontario Ministry of Health-funded program to return individuals with severe brain injuries to their homes in the community from U.S. rehabilitation hospitals.

And this was perhaps my greatest learning opportunity of all my training and work so far.

Why? Well, when you work in hospital settings, you kind of get used to being the Authority.

But in working with these families to bring their severely-injured family members back into their own homes...

Well, I could hardly claim to be the authority in their home, could I?

So I learned to be a Resource instead of the Authority and to be honest about helping others reach their own goals and create their own lives, instead of "prescribing" what I thought was best for them.

From Chedoke-McMaster, I was asked to join West Park Hospital in Toronto to start-up two new repatriation programs for people who had developed severe behavioural challenges following their brain injury.

After getting the programs up and running, the hospital and I "parted ways" due to philosophical and professional differences. (Enough said.)

And here came another huge learning opportunity.

After doing some consulting work for a few months, I submitted a proposal to the Ministry of Health for funding to provide support services for individuals with brain injury to live in the community in their own apartments.

The whole idea of having my own "company" scared me to death, but I saw it as an opportunity to say "what if?"

What if:

  • we could create and live a vision where everyone in the organization - those that lived there and those that worked there - were a member of a supportive, caring community? (a "Co-op model")?
  • we could provide rehabilitation and support services authentically in collaboration with the person receiving them?
  • we could hire, train, support, and evaluate our service providers in whatever ways we thought would help them share the vision?
  • we could recreate any and all "rehabilitation" and "support" wheels to do things the way our hearts told us they should be done?

Tall order!
Very exciting!
Scary!!

Well, we got the funding, created abi Possibilities, and are trying to explore how we can live our vision every day. For more about abi Possibilities, please visit their website. (Possibilities integrated in 2014 with PACE Independent Living - a group supporting people living with physical disabilities who shared our philosophy.)

The exploration wasn't over yet, of course.

In the year 2003, I had a flare of arthritis. I had experienced joint pains on and off since I was 16 years old, but this was much worse.

As I mention on my home page, I started exploring alternatives to strong medications -- and in the course of my explorations, discovered neurofeedback.

You've heard the rest of that story if you've read my home page, so I won't repeat it here, except to share that:

I'm grateful that I've been able to discover heart and brain neurofeedback and I'm delighted to invite you to share that exploration with me!

  • we could create and live a vision where everyone in the organization - those that lived there and those that worked there - were a member of a supportive, caring community? (a "Co-op model")?
  • we could provide rehabilitation and support services authentically in collaboration with the person receiving them?
  • we could hire, train, support, and evaluate our service providers in whatever ways we thought would help them share the vision?
  • we could recreate any and all "rehabilitation" and "support" wheels to do things the way our hearts told us they should be done?
  • I feel I've progressed in my own personal evolution by leaps and bounds since starting this path.
  • I've been able to resolve some of my own health issues.
  • I find myself feeling much more Connected to myself and my clients than I ever did before.